BA (Hons) Sustainable Development and Social Change

Global Development, Politics and Sociology

Quick info & apply now

Degree

UCAS CODE

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Start Date(s)

Attendance

Learning

L9L4

112 UCAS POINTS

UCAS points will be updated soon

September 2024

  • Full time, 3 years
  • Part time, 6 years
  • On campus
both SF2013
SF2013
Degree with foundation year

UCAS CODE

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Start Date(s)

Attendance

Learning

L900

64 UCAS POINTS

UCAS points will be updated soon

September 2024

  • Full time, 4 years
  • Part time, 8 years
  • On campus
both SF2023
SF2023

Fees and Funding

Here's the fees and funding information for each year of this course

September 2024

Attendance

Fee

Note

Home
Full time 3/4/5 years
£9,250
Per year
Part time
£2,310
Price per 20 or 40 credit module
International
Full time, 1 year
£14,820
Per year

Overview

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

MODULES

  • Core Modules
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    Exploring Communities as Social Scientists

    This module extends your understanding of local and global communities through applying the sociological concepts of community, identity, place, social memory and migration. It builds on your existing knowledge of the global and local contexts of your future academic study and employment. Cultural capital and knowledge of the complexities of communities will be introduced through topical readings, a guided walk of a London neighbourhood and a visit to a museum that you will prepare for and reflect on, using the key concepts of identity, place, social memory and migration. The module frontloads key academic skills required for university education and consolidates them throughout the module in order to support your learning in other modules at this level and above as well as your future careers.

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    Researching Changing Communities

    The module extends your previous knowledge and understanding of how and why local ‘communities’ change over time. ‘Communities’ will be defined either geographically - such as a territorial neighbourhood/post code or culturally - such as an ethnic, linguistic or religious group. It builds on your experiential knowledge of local and global communities through introducing you to academic and policy-related literature and to sociological concepts, research methods, skills and ethics. The module also consolidates core academic skills valuable in other modules as well as your future career. You will carry out a small, guided research project that will include a semi-structured interview with an individual professionally or socially connected to the ‘community’ combined with secondary research reading academic and policy literature) into the chosen ‘community’. In addition, the research project allows you to engage with and apply sociological concepts studied in all other L3 modules on this programme (for example crime, surveillance, globalisation, as well as core career related modules.).

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    Reimagining the Work of a Social Scientist

    This module brings you into contact with the communities and professional settings that you, as social scientists, may aspire to engage with and/or work within. The module engages you in flipped classroom activities and real-world issues through visits, external speakers and group activities. Through engagement with people who work in social science related fields the module builds your social and cultural capital for future employment and helps you become a flexible thinker. It focuses on understanding inclusivity in the workplace and society. This module will also allow you the opportunity to acquire tangible evidence to support your employability narrative, including preparation for future placements and interviews, as you progress through your academic studies, The focus will be on professional communication skills, team work and industry and community connections. The module will consider the relationship between community action, critical thinking outside the classroom and career aspirations by introducing you to real world settings where social science and social theories are currently applied. It challenges you to think critically about the everyday.

    External visits include group visits to art gallery or a museum, community organisation or an NGO supporting and advocating for people with vulnerabilities and other professional organisations. These visits are followed by guest speakers and lectures which engage you in similar debates. You may also make an independent visit to a court, political organisation or a museum and develop your organisational, independent research and professional communication skills through such visits.

    Optional Modules
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    Crime, Justice and Surveillance

    This module introduces you to crime and surveillance from sociological and criminological perspectives and offers you theoretical and practical skills and experiences that prepare you for your journey as a criminologist. It considers how surveillance overlaps with many fields, including crime detection and prevention and the management of dangerous spaces and people.  It also offers an introduction to Cybercrime and you will be  asked to produce a public information leaflet that outlines the dangers of the internet. It includes a field trip to see a court in action as part of the teaching for coursework two.

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    Reading the Body Psychosocially

     

    In this module, you will consider the choices you make in relation to your own body and its presentation to others and in so doing will consider how a psychosocial approach to the body embraces choices informed rationally and irrationally. The latter incorporate the personal and political as well as changing attitudes to health and life.

    The human body and the nature of embodiment constitute a critical area of academic research and are central to cultural and social change. In a rapidly changing globalised world the body is a prime terrain of identity formation through popular discourses, surgical interventions, the aesthetisation of everyday life and online practices. At the same time, the commodification of the body, whereby the body becomes fragmented into a series of parts, objectified and represented through the media and promotional culture, is normalised as ‘ideal’. But what of its counterparts: the diseased body; the ageing body; the disabled body or even the monstrous body, the subject of literature and film since Shelley’s Frankenstein and the postmodern turn to vampires and zombies?

    This module adopts a Psychosocial approach (as an integral part of the Social Sciences), whereby the body can be explored as a contested site for the operations of affect, power and identity, and explored via social categories such as gender, race, class and dis/ability. Bringing together sociological and cultural theory with basic concept of Freudian psychoanalysis, this module provides you with a succinct and focused introduction to interdisciplinary thinking within the Social Sciences.

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    Introduction to Digital Sociology

    This module introduces you to Digital Sociology by exploring what it means to be a sociologist in the rapidly developing technological world. It will also introduce you to digital social research methods, asking what issues there are for social researchers in a digital society; what new material is available to social researchers; how social scientists can harness the new tools available to them and how they can navigate through this space in a secure, mindful and ethical way? 

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    Globalisation and Society

    This module introduces you to key issues and debates about globalisation and society.  Knowledge of the complexities of globalisation is introduced through [a] topical readings [b] a guided tour of Parliament [c] a visit to the British Museum that you will prepare for and reflect on, using the key concepts of political economy. As well as the two core visits, the topics are presented and examined through lectures, seminars, workshops and film.

  • Core Modules
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    Becoming an Activist (Mental Wealth)

    This module prepares learners for their course of studies by starting their first year with a focus on how the knowledge and skills they will develop during their course will prepare them to be social activists, a role which can be played out in a variety of different careers and volunteer activities through the course of their lives. The module will also provide an introduction to the key Vision 2028 ‘UEL Graduate Attributes’, such as the psychological and physical determinants of human performance that are difficult or impossible to replicate by Artificial Intelligence (AI).

    The module aspires to provide an intellectually integrative and socially cohesive workshop experience which also includes opportunities to put into practice study skills that will help ensure their success at UEL as well as help them reflect on how those skills will prepare them for future professional roles. The module will provide an opportunity for learners to review their own personal development to date self-reflexively.

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    Introduction to Development Studies

    This module introduces you to the key contemporary debates in development studies through a multi-disciplinary approach covering social, economic, political, cultural, environmental and technological perspectives. The module aims to provide you with understanding of the theoretical and practical issues that relate to global development and offers understanding of and supports you in developing knowledge and skills required for entry into the professional workplace or for higher studies. The module will give you opportunity to develop analytical skills and critical perspectives on global development and you will have guest lectures from educators and practitioners to complement your learning and to ensure you are very much up-to date. The module provides you a firm basis for entry to level 5.

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    Global Political Economy

    This module will help you to make sense of the complex world facing us today and will demystify economics by thinking about this from political perspectives. It is a crucial foundation for you if you have an interest in global affairs and the module seeks to look backwards to important classical theories, to look at the world facing us today (and in the future) to see whether classical approaches from political economy make sense in global times. You will learn some of the basics of economic theory (not through maths) and will consider key traditions within political and economic thought. Further to this you will develop a good understanding of the contemporary global economy and where it came from, focusing particularly on the post-war period, crisis in the global economy over the past thirty years, and what all of this means for us today. By the end of this module you will have a strong understanding of the three main traditions within political economy and how influential they remain in the key social, political and economic.

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    Digital Sociology and the 4th Industrial Revolution

    Since the 1970s when social theorists like Bell and Touraine proclaimed the coming of post-industrial society there has been a growing interest in the implications of technological change on society and in particular on the central role of information in these transformations. 

    This module is about the relationships between technological change, i.e. the emergence of the so-called 4th Industrial revolution (Schwab 2017) and social relationships. Moreover, it is also concerned with the implications of all of this for are capacity and ability to make sense of these changes via social science and the arguments that we need to develop a 'digital sociology' (Orton-Johnson and Prior 2013, Lupton 2015, and Marres 2017) to do this.

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    The Mess We Are In (And How We Got Here)

    In this module we will consider the representation of the present as a moment of crisis. This will include consideration of:

    • Economic crisis, including welfare reform and austerity
    • Political crisis, including democratic deficits and populism
    • Ecological crisis
    • National crisis, including questions of identity, racism and justice
    • Emotional crisis, including links between individual well-being and social structures.

    The module will introduce students to histories of empire and colonialism in order to understand long-standing processes of expropriation and ecological degradation in the name of progress.

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    International Relations

    The module introduces students to the study of international relations through the study of a range of international issues.

  • Core Modules
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    Space, Bodies and Power

    This module introduces students to debates about bodies and embodiment and the exercise of power across spaces. We will discuss practices of surveillance, bordering and the relation of these practices to colonial practices of ordering and to ecological crisis. We will revisit questions of inequality, inclusion and stigmatisation. This will include a consideration of questions of sexuality and sexual rights and disability rights.

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    Mental Wealth 2: Social Enterprise

    This module aims to introduce students to a range of planning and fundraising models and techniques used in the third sector. It will build their competence and confidence in designing and presenting their own projects and fundraising ideas. It will be delivered in collaboration with UEL Enterprise and other partner third sector organisations. This is the second of 3 modules running through the BA (Hons) International Development with NGO Management, which will incrementally build a full set of competencies for work in the not-for-profit sector.

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    Research Methods

    This module explores methods of professional learning, including literature research, practitioner enquiry, action research and ethics.

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    Inequalities and Social Change

    This module enables you to conceptualise the linkages between inequalities, social change and livelihoods and to apply these understandings to ‘real life’ urgent issues to inform and enhance policy and practice.

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    Environmental Justice

    This module introduces students to the understandings of environmental crisis, global warming and climate justice. The discussions will inform and engage students with how we can tackle global warming with fairness and equity. Climate change is one of the most complex political, social, and environmental issues of this century, and climate change adaptation has become an increasingly large focus of global efforts. The international community’s attention on adaptation has been primarily focused on developing countries’ needs, with consensus that the world’s most vulnerable communities—the urban and rural poor, low-lying island nations, and indigenous peoples—require additional protection. It was in response to this need for equity that “climate justice” emerged.

    Optional Modules
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    Global Governance

    The module provides an overview of the theory and practice of global governance, with a particular focus on the structure, functioning and competences of the United Nations. By exploring a whole range of policy dilemmas, alternatives and outcomes, the module will help students to develop a critical understanding of the dominant concerns and possible solutions (at national, regional and global levels). In addition, the module addresses the nature of cooperation and major policy initiatives between the UN and other international organisations. In conclusion, the module will revisit the main problems that global governance has encountered along with proposals for solutions.

    In this module, each session comprises a lecture plus a seminar. The aims of the seminars are to stimulate debate, to provide an opportunity for all students to swap ideas, to explore different theories and policy preferences, to link with the lectures in order to aid understanding of the key topics of the course. The module benefits from a variety of approaches (debates, presentations and group discussions) to explore the issues in global governance.

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    Human Mobility and Forced Migration

    This module offers you the skills and knowledge to understand causes, patterns and impacts of migration, including forced migration and displacement. In this module we will develop critical thinking, analytical skills, teamwork skills, group facilitation and active listening skills to explore the diversity of experiences of displacement, diaspora, asylum, and integration. We will use subject-based, digital and life skills in groups to discuss legal regimes governing migration, human rights, reconciliation and peace building and promote social change.

  • Core Modules
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    Mental Wealth 3: Placement Reflections

    The Placement Reflections module aims to bring together learning from reading, lectures, coursework and discussions during the first two years, first by applying the skills learned in a real  life work environment, then by reflecting on the placement experience and relating it to the key concepts and debates in your area of study. To achieve this, you are required to work for at least two days a week for a minimum of 10 weeks (or 20 working days total) as a volunteer for an organisation with a speciality in your area of study. During this time, you should carry out an identifiable project agreed with the host organisation for this module. The Module Leaders of each programme will provide guidance and briefings for you on securing a suitable placement.

    During the work placement you are expected to:

    • Improve skills for future employment
    • Engage in “real life” projects which will enable students to put academic knowledge into practice and place practice into an academic context.
    • Develop key personal and professional skills such as team-working, time management, working under pressure and self-evaluation.
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    Applied Research Project in Social Sciences

    This module allows you to apply your understanding of key social scientific theories and concepts as well as issues and methods in social and community work to a research question of your choice. The module introduces necessary research and evaluation tools and methods and ethical procedures, data collection and analysis methods and starts you on your journey to becoming independent researchers. You will complete an independent research project or an evaluation of a project you have been involved with through placements, volunteering or work experience. You will receive support and guidance throughout the independent research and are encouraged to reflect on the methodological, ethical and theoretical issues that you will face in the course of your research experience.

    Optional Modules
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    African Politics and Development

    This module will provide you with a thorough introduction to African politics and the place of the continent in global affairs today. African political and economic systems are introduced and critiqued, supported by evidence from across the continent. This module will consider the relevance of important political concepts within African contexts and align these with relevant social theories from African and non-African theorists alike.

    You will learn through different case studies each week, focusing on one or more African countries in order to bring the political theories and concepts to life and to compare and contrast their relevance within different national contexts across the African continent. The development implications of political and economic realities will be discussed, in order to ensure that you understand the importance of this notion in African contexts and how difficult it has been to achieve.

    During the course, you will write and publish a blog focusing on a political issue facing one or more African countries and you will also act as a reviewer to the blog that another student has written, prior to submission. These blogs will then be uploaded onto the module website for consumption by the public. You will also complete one section of a country report as part of a student group and collectively you will produce a detailed report about a given African country, considering the political, economic, security, humanitarian and development situation. Sections will be written separately but then co-edited to create a coherent overall piece. On completing this module, you will have both a blog and a country report which will be available online and can be shared with potential employers in future. The skills that you develop, coupled with the in-depth regional knowledge, will prove to be priceless.

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    Conflict Intervention and Development

    To examine the causes and consequences of the proliferation of internal armed conflicts since the last decade of the 20th century, often referred to as complex political emergencies. To engage critically with current conceptual debates on different forms of intervention - particularly emergency aid and military intervention, that characterise the so-called New World Order. and, through detailed case studies, different forms of intervention – particularly emergency aid and military intervention - in the post-Cold War order. To provide a critical assessment of these interventions, by focusing on different case studies, and by relating these to contemporary debates around notions of humanitarian assistance, transitional justice and the global community.

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    Gender, Power and Politics

    In this module you will explore gendered power relations within the political realm of society. You will be engaged in critical examination of the differential inclusion of men and women in the political realm. This will enable you to understand different forms of their political action in their historical and contemporary contexts.

    Each session of this module comprises a lecture and a seminar. Lectures are based on interactive teaching methods and aim to inform, provide evidence and stimulate informed critical debate on a range of key issues relevant for gender equality in the contemporary world. Seminars are designed to further critical debates relevant for this module by providing students with opportunity to swap ideas, explore concepts, policies, and modes of thinking about gender, gender power systems and identities in the modern world.

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    Global Political Ecology

    What are the drivers of climate change? Why have the policies adopted so far have failed to significantly reduce emissions? Why are many people still suffering hunger and extreme poverty in the world? Does the promise of technological fixes offer us hope or instead they are perpetrating the myth of endless economic growth? What are the possible solutions in the 21st century to the main crises we face as a plural humanity? How do inequality and power interconnect  in stratified modes of social metabolism? These are some of the questions we will approach in the study of global political ecology. Though theoretically and methodologically diverse in their individual approaches, political ecologists generally agree that definitions, understandings, and responses to environmental problems will nearly always be inherently political. As a result, political ecology explores the main actors and processes involved in the management and use of a wide range of environmental systems – as well as their often-divergent interests, aims, norms, powers and narratives.

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    Constructions of 'Race' in Culture and Politics

    The aim of this module is to examine the ways in which concepts of race have developed historically in the West and to look at some of the key social, political, and theoretical consequences of this. The module begins with looking at the argument that ‘race’ is a social construct then the module examines the ways in which this has been constructed and reconstructed in different historical periods and the political struggles that have surrounded this.

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    Gender Studies

    The aim of this module is to familiarise you with key concepts, issues, questions and debates in gender studies and explore and analyse gender relations in a range of social spheres and institutions such as education, work, culture, law and the family.

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    Culture, Media and Politics

    This module introduces students to key debates in the field of cultural sociology, including debates about fashion, media, memory and the presentation of self.

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    Psychological Approaches to Environmental Sustainability

    This module provides critically evaluative knowledge and understanding of the application of Environmental Psychology to practical problems of sustainability and environmental behaviour. In doing so, it aims to enable students to critically evaluate the contribution of environmental psychological approaches to individual and group interactions with natural resources. Students will critically explore the consequences of these approaches for current research and practical applications, including behaviour change, communication. We shall learn about theories and models that attempt to understand behaviour change; in doing so, the module explores key questions in research, including how environmental psychology theory and practice relate, the role of individual and group conceptualisations of environmental problems, and it applies environmental psychology approaches to an understanding of how practices that respond to these problems can be developed.

HOW YOU'LL LEARN

HOW YOU'LL BE ASSESSED

CAMPUS and FACILITIES

Docklands Campus

Docklands Campus, Docklands Campus, London, E16 2RD

WHO TEACHES THIS COURSE

The teaching team includes qualified academics, practitioners and industry experts as guest speakers. Full details of the academics will be provided in the student handbook and module guides.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER